Newsletter

Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2015, XXI/3: 109-114 Maximize

Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2015, XXI/3: 109-114

Title: Alarm pathogens isolated from patients of pediatric ward – clinical and epidemiological implications

Authors: Nitsch-Osuch A, Tymoczko A, Jaroszewska K, Lipka B, Kubik P. 

More details

02-03-2015

40,00 zł

SUMMARY IN POLISH & ENGLISH. FULL ARTICLE ONLY IN POLISH.

Alarm pathogens isolated from patients of pediatric ward – clinical and epidemiological implications


Nitsch-Osuch A1,2, Tymoczko A3, Jaroszewska K2, Lipka B2, Kubik P2.

1Chair and Department of Family Medicine with Ward of Internal and Metabolic Diseases, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland; 2Specialistic Hospital of Holy Family in Warsaw; 3Voyevodish Sanitary and Epidemiology Post in Warsaw

Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2015; Vol. 21, No. 3, 109

The alarm pathogens are defined as microorganisms of the particular virulence or resistance. The information about the infection and colonization caused by alarm pathogens should be included in the hospital discharge letters providing an important information for GPs, suggesting the need of micorbiological monitoring or developing specific sanitary procedures. The aim of the study was to describe alarm pathogens isolated from patients of pediatric ward. Material and methods. The retrospective analysis of the hospital alarm pathogens register was conducted. The alert pathogens were isolated from patients aged 0-18 years from one general pediatric ward in Warsaw in years 2013-2014. Results. The most common alarm pathogen was rotavirus (80%). All rotavirus infections were symptomatic, most of them were community-acquired (89% cases). In children with urinary tract infection the most frequently isolated alarm bacteria was Escherichia coli ESBL+ (6 cases). The majority of pathogens isolated from the blood were classified as a skin colonization. Two cases of E. coli ESBL+ bacteriemia were associated with urinary tract infections, one case of the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae was associated with pneumonia. One otitis media caused by MRSA was diagnosed. The isolates of E. coli ESBL+ were naturally resistant to ampicillin and amoxicillin and fully sensitive to meropenem and imipenem. Conclusions. The most common alarm pathogen in the pediatric ward was rotavirus. Vaccination against rotavirus gastroenterocolitis should be implemented into a national immunization schedule in order to decrease the number of cases. More educational activities focused on the promotion of the hand hygiene as the main prophylactic procedure, activities directed to pediatric ward staff and to patients should be conducted.

Key words: alarm pathogen, multidrug resistant bacteria, children, pediatric ward