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Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2014, XX/1: 028-034 Maximize

Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2014, XX/1: 028-034

Title: Analysis of the implementation of hospital antibiotic policy in selected specialist hospital in Warsaw

/ Authors: Jaroszewska K., Gawlak M., Chazan B., Nitsch-Osuch A.

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05-01-2014

40,00 zł

SUMMARY IN POLISH & ENGLISH. FULL ARTICLE ONLY IN POLISH.

Analysis of the implementation of hospital antibiotic policy in selected specialist hospital in Warsaw

Jaroszewska K.1, Gawlak M.1, Chazan B.1, Nitsch-Osuch A.2,1


1St. Families Specialist Hospital in Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Family Medicine and Division of Clinical Internal and Metabolic Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland

Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2014; Vol. 20, No. 1, 028

The worldwide emergence of antimicrobial resistance is a major public health problem that significantly impacts patient treatment and outcomes. The relationship between antimicrobial use and antimicrobial resistance is complex with a growing body of data strongly suggesting that higher levels of antibiotic use are associated with increased levels of antimicrobial resistance.
The aim
of the study was to evaluate the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions in a secondary level of specialist hospital with gynecological and obstetric wards in Warsaw.
Material and methods
. The retrospective analysis of antibiotic consumption in 2011 was conducted. The source of analyzed data were reports from hospital pharmacy. The data describing consumption of antibiotics were presented by defined daily dose methodology (DDDs/100 person days).
Results
. The total antibiotic consumption was similar at the gynecological ward and obstetric ward (respectively 27,6 DDD/ 100 person days and 27,5 DDD/100 person days). At the gynecological ward the mostly prescribed antibiotics were penicillins with betalactamase inhibitors (38,4%) and cephalosporines of third and second generation (respectively 16,6% and 15,3%). At the obstetric ward the most often prescribed antibiotics were penicillins and cephalospirins of second generation (71,4%).
Conclusions
. The results indicated the total antibiotic use in the gynecological and obstetric wards at the hospital were at the comparable level with other European countries and lower than at Polish hospitals of general profile or intensive care units. Our results may serve as a source for future comparisons at our hospital and for other hospitals.

Key words: antibiotics, consumption, antibiotic policy