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Pol. Merkur. Lek (Pol. Med. J.), 2016, XL/235: 066-069 Maximize

Pol. Merkur. Lek (Pol. Med. J.), 2016, XL/235: 066-069

Title: Mitoxantrone role in treatment of primary progressive multiple sclerosis

Authors: Pastuszak Ż, Stępień A, Tomczykiewicz K, Piusińska-Macoch R, Durka-Kęsy M.

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SUMMARY IN POLISH & ENGLISH. FULL ARTICLE ONLY IN POLISH.

Mitoxantrone role in treatment of primary progressive multiple sclerosis


Pastuszak Ż, Stępień A, Tomczykiewicz K, Piusińska-Macoch R, Durka-Kęsy M.

Department of Neurology, Central Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of National Defense, Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, autoimmunological disease of central nervous system in which axonal damage in brain and spinal cord is observed. It is second most common cause of disability in young adults in West Europe and North America after injuries. There is 2.5 million people suffered from multiple sclerosis worldwide. The worse prognosis is connected with primary progressive MS in which recovery after first symptoms of central nervous system damage isn't observed. That subtype of disease is seen in case of 10-20% people with MS. MTX is a synthetic antracycline with antineoplastic, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Drug was allowed to treatment of leukemia. It is also used in treatment of breast, prostate, ovarian, stomach and liver cancer. Additionally MTX is used in treatment of secondary progressive SM and relapsing – remitting subtype of disease with no respond to treatment with interferon beta and glatiramer acetate. MTX inhibits topoisomerase II activity, matches to DNA molecule and damage her structure. Drug inhibits limphocyte T, B and macrophages activity and antibodies synthesis. The most dangerous side effects of MTX treatment are cardiotoxicity and induction of leukemia. There is lack of studies describing MTX effectiveness and safety in treatment of primary progressive SM.

Key words: multiple sclerosis, mitoxantrone, primmary progressive multiple sclerosis

Pol Med J, 2016; XL (235); 66–69