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International Review of Medical Practice, 2021, XXVII/1: 031-040 Maximize

International Review of Medical Practice, 2021, XXVII/1: 031-040

Title: The use of mind and body practices in integrative oncology 

Authors: Szypłowska M, Kuś A, Piecewicz-Szczęsna H. 

Version: FULL ARTICLE IN ENGLISH

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05-01-2021

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SUMMARY IN POLISH & ENGLISH. FULL ARTICLE ONLY IN ENGLISH.

The use of mind and body practices in integrative oncology


Szypłowska M1, Kuś A2, Piecewicz-Szczęsna H3.

Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland: 1Student Research Group at the I Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Early Intervention; 2Student Research Group at the Department of Epidemiology and Clinical Research Methodology; 3Department of Epidemiology and Clinical Research Methodology.

International Review of Medical Practice, 2021; Vol. 27, No. 1, 031

The use of supportive therapies is prevalent among cancer patients who are seeking various approaches on how to manage the symptoms of cancer and adverse effects of cancer treatment. In modern cancer care, there is a movement towards a person-centered care which combines clinical care and research. Integrative oncology is a medical field with the focus on the mind-body relationship, utilizing resources from within the patient for achieving mental and physical wellbeing. Alongside conventional treatments, patients can engage in mind and body practices, such as acupuncture, massage or yoga, to help them optimize their health and clinical outcomes. There is a growing body of evidence that supports the use of integrative therapies in cancer care as effective interventions for specific clinical indications. The aim of this systematic review paper is to evaluate the efficacy of mind and body practices in integrative oncology and the evidence associated with its benefits and detriments. We searched on PubMed/MEDLINE database up to 20 July, 2020 and reviewed publications on mind and body practices in integrative oncology. However, there are many integrative interventions that lack of strong evidence and they should be used with caution or ultimately avoided, until further research is available. Only practices with a strong body of evidence have been reviewed in this paper.

Key words: integrative oncology, acupuncture, massage, meditation, yoga