Newsletter

Pol. Merkur. Lek (Pol. Med. J.), 2015, XXXVIII/224: 093-099 Maximize

Pol. Merkur. Lek (Pol. Med. J.), 2015, XXXVIII/224: 093-099

Title: The level of lipid peroxidation in milk replacer formulas for initial feeding of infants 

Authors: Czeczot H, Cichosz G, Ambroziak A.

More details

06/224

40,00 zł

SUMMARY IN POLISH & ENGLISH. FULL ARTICLE ONLY IN POLISH.

The level of lipid peroxidation in milk replacer formulas for initial feeding of infants


Czeczot H1, Cichosz G2, Ambroziak A2.

1Department of Biochemistry, I Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Dairy Science and Quality Management, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland

The products of lipids oxidation: peroxides, hydroxides, aldehydes, ketones, esters, alcohols and others show harmful activity against human organism. Presence of the compounds in baby’s and children’s food creates potential health hazard. Many of them cause infant’s and children’s diarrhoea, also, negatively influence development of nervous system, show cytotoxic, mutagenic and cancerogenic activity (e.g. malonicdialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal and others).
The aim of the work
was to assess the level of lipids peroxidation in milk substitute preparations for initial stage baby feeding, before their end of shelf-life.
Materials and methods
. The level of lipids peroxidation measured as TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) concentrations was determined in 6 available on the Polish market milk substitute infant formulas. The determinations was carried out before the end of the shelf-life after 1,2,3,6,9 and 12 months after purchase. The level of lipid peroxidation was also determined after 3-4 and 21 days post opening.
Results
. TBARS content in the infants food ready to be eaten depended on the time of preparation storage. The highest level of lipids peroxidation was observed in all the studied food after 12 months of storage and after 21 days after opening of the hermetical wrapping. Various level of lipids peroxidation in milk substitutes for infant nutrition resulted from different amounts and quality of plant oils used in production (different content of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, presence of lack of linoleic and α-linolenic acids).

Key words: infant formulae, human milk, level of peroxidation lipids, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), malondialdehyde (MDA)

Pol Med J, 2015; XXXVIII (224); 93–99