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Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2015, XXI/2: 062-067 Maximize

Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2015, XXI/2: 062-067

Title: Clinical characteristics of patients with natural killer cell partial deficiency 

Authors: Kurek B, Kućma M, Szorek J, Glück J.

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02-02-2015

40,00 zł

SUMMARY IN POLISH & ENGLISH. FULL ARTICLE ONLY IN POLISH.

Clinical characteristics of patients with natural killer cell partial deficiency


Kurek B1, Kućma M1, Szorek J1, Glück J2.

Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland: 1Students’ Scientific Society; 2Department and Clinic of Internal Diseases, Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Int. Rev. Allergol. Clin. Immunol. Family Med., 2015; Vol. 21, No. 2, 62

Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune system and are involved in antiviral and anticancer response. Nowadays, due to greater availability of flow cytometry, various disorders of lymphocytes including NK cells deficiency are detected more often.
The aim of this study
was clinical characteristics of diagnosed patients with reduced number of NK cells.
Material and methods
. A retrospective analysis of medical histories of 68 patients (47 women, 69%) aged 18-72 with absolute or percentage NK cell deficiency was demonstrated based on phenotyping of peripheral blood lymphocytes by flow cytometry. Occurrence of the six main warning symptoms suggestive immune deficiency, co-existence of allergic, autoimmune and neoplastic disorders and recurrent infections were estimated.
Results
. Most patients had symptoms of impaired immunity, such as recurrent upper respiratory tract infections. 30 (44.1%) people had at least one of the six warning signs. 20 (29.4%) people had allergic diseases, 15 (22,1%) patients had autoimmune diseases, 3 (4.4%) patients were diagnosed with cancer in the past. In 46 (67.6%) individuals other laboratory abnormalities have been identified such as reduced number of CD19+, CD4+ or CD8+ cells. Only 6 (8.8%) patients had decreased levels of immunoglobulins, including IgA in 2 (2.9%) patients, IgG in 2 (2.9%) patients had, and IgM in 3 (4.4%) patients.
Conclusions
. NK cell deficiency may be asymptomatic, but most of the people have symptoms of reduced immunity. NK deficiency can coexist with other immune disorders and with allergic and autoimmune diseases.

Key words: NK cells, flow cytometry, immune deficiency