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Pol. Merkur. Lek (Pol. Med. J.), 2015, XXXIX/234: 382-388 Maximize

Pol. Merkur. Lek (Pol. Med. J.), 2015, XXXIX/234: 382-388

Title: New definition of ventilator associated pneumonia might not necessarily have been a step in the right direction. Key takeaways from published studies after two years in clinical use 

Authors: Zamaro-Michalska A, Adamczyk A, Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz M, Siewiera J, Łazowski T.

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SUMMARY IN POLISH & ENGLISH. FULL ARTICLE ONLY IN POLISH.

New definition of ventilator associated pneumonia might not necessarily have been a step in the right direction. Key takeaways from published studies after two years in clinical use


Zamaro-Michalska A1, Adamczyk A1, Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz M1, Siewiera J2, Łazowski T1.

1I Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Military Institute of Medicine in Warsaw, Poland

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. VAP is associated with prolonged hospitalization and visibly increased mortality, which in the group of patients with VAP ranges from 25% to 47%. In January 2013 Centers of Disease Control and Prevention introduced a new definition for VAP. Subjective criteria in the previous VAP definition were the reason for difficulties in VAP surveillance and assessment of efficacy of ventilator bundles and other quality improvement initiatives. The purpose of this article is to summarise the new definition of VAP and the first researches after two years of use of the new definition. The new definition of ventilator-associated events (VAE) identifies a broader group of patients than the previous VAP definition. Surveillance of all complications of mechanical ventilation aimed to create more efficient prophylaxis bundles and to decrease the mortality in critically ill patients. The latest published studies suggest that most of the complications defined as VAE are patient-related, not modifiable risk factors and these patients had no evidence of hospital-acquired complications. The new definition failed to detect many patients with VAP and it has not resolved the ambiguities related to the diagnosis of this complication. It seems that the new surveillance program will not lead to introducing new prevention strategies that could decrease the mortality in intensive care unit patients.

Key words: ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator associated events, nosocomial pneumonia, mechanical ventilation, prevention

Pol Med J, 2015; XXXIX (234); 382–388